How I’ve Been Beating Procrastination

Posted by under Mindsetting, Productivity . Published: October 8, 2020

I believe it’s human nature to resist change and avoid discomfort. Our minds and our bodies don’t like it when we have to work too hard on anything.

This is one of the reasons why it’s difficult to break bad habits and learn good and new ones. It’s also one of the reasons why we procrastinate, which is often to avoid burdensome tasks.

“I don’t feel like it.”

How many times have you said this to yourself?

In my case, I’ve said this more often than I wanted. Usually, when I had to go to the gym, analyze a financial report, or write a blog post, among many other tasks.

And if there’s anything I learned in all those times, it’s that giving in to laziness or procrastination can severely limit my potential.

By choosing not to be productive because I’m not in the mood or I don’t feel like doing the things that I have to do, I am consequently sabotaging my growth as a person, slowing the improvement of my skills, and in a way, limiting my ability to make more money.

However, I also realized that whenever I’m in this mindset of setting things aside for later, the obstacle that’s stopping me from accomplishing the task is 100% within my control.

And to say that I don’t feel like doing something is more often than not, just an excuse.

There’s nothing outside myself that’s actually stopping me from doing the thing that needs to be done.

Do you agree?

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The 5-Minute Rule

Stephen King says, “Amateurs sit and wait for inspiration, the rest of us just get up and go to work.”

And for many years, this has been my solution whenever I’m not in the mood to do work.

I force myself to go to the gym, oblige my mind to open the computer, compel my fingers to type words — and for the most part, it works. And I called it The 5-Minute Rule.

During times when I don’t feel like doing something, I tell myself to just put in five minutes of work. And if after that, I still lack the motivation, then I can guiltlessly stop and do something else.

However and efficiently enough, those five minutes would create the momentum that I need to carry on and finish the task at hand.

Give yourself permission to do imperfect work.

When fighting against laziness and procrastination, it’s important to give yourself permission to do imperfect work.

In my case, I tell myself that it’s okay to just walk on the treadmill at the gym and not do anything else, to just look at the spreadsheets and not do any analysis, and to draft a poorly-written blog article.

That it’s okay to simply make an attempt. Just put in the work and focus on making progress.

Avoid thinking that you need to get things done, much less to do a perfect job. At the end of the day, what’s more helpful and important is to simply get things started.

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4 Responses to “How I’ve Been Beating Procrastination”


  1. Hotch says:

    No matter how successful you are financially, all those money just goes to your hospital bills if you’re not healthy.. Pagtanda mo, dun lang mapupunta sa gastos sa sakit mo.. diabetes, hypertension, etc… You have to lose weight sir Fritz.. Ive seen almost all your videos and never seen you light. Unlike Marvin Germo, anlaki ng difference nung itsura nya ngayon kumpara 5 years ago.. Maybe there’s something wrong with your work out program.. maybe something wrong with your diet.. or ikaw mismo, bka tamad ka mag exercise.. or walang habas sa kain… Magaling kang financial adviser, but u definitely need a good fitness advisor…

  2. Fitz says:

    @Hotch
    Diabetes and heart disease runs in our family, that’s why I take my parents for quarterly check-ups with our doctor, which consequently allows me to talk to her as well about my health.

    I agree that being healthy is important, and I’m grateful that our family doctor says that I am. My diagnostic results last June came back normal, and it’s been normal for almost 4 years.

    Yes, I am aware that I don’t visually subscribe to what society would stereotypically consider fit and healthy, and I’m okay with it – and I’m actually used to people judging me for it.

    Thank you for your concern and your comment because it’s given me a chance to address something that I’m sure other people are also thinking about me.

  3. Thanks sir Fitz for this 5-min rule tip. Will be using it for sure.

  4. Hotch says:

    My apologies Fritz if u felt slighted by my comment.., no intention to bodyshame anyone…. Its good that your blood chem & other tests are normal.. but that is just one aspect of seeing if you’re healthy.. Another equally important factor is keeping your weight within normal BMI.. U dont have to look like Derek Ramsay to achieve that. But the further u are from normal BMI, the higher risk and the sooner u will get into that familial/pre-disposed condition (hypertention & diabetes). .. Since u have that unmatched dedication and patience in planning for your financial goals, maybe u can also channel that same energy into your fitness journey.. U can do it…

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