The Rewards of Questioning Your Every Spending

Posted by Fitz Villafuerte under Money Saving Tips on August 18, 2014

If you want to lessen your expenses, one simple trick is to ask yourself, “Is this worth it?” before making any purchase.

Doing this will prevent you from buying things on impulse, but more importantly, it will raise the quality of your life because you’ll find yourself spending more on things that really matter.

Avoid Impulse Buying

You’re in line at the grocery and you see the chocolate bars on the shelf beside the cashier. Your mouth starts to water and mindlessly reach out to pick one.

But before making your final decision, ask yourself, “Is this worth it?”

Questioning your spending will force you to come up with a good reason to buy something – and most of the time, if it’s an impulse buy – there will be none.

Staying on Budget

You’re at the mall and a shoe on a window display catches your attention. You go inside the boutique and ask how much it is.

Before requesting for your shoe size so you can try it on, ask yourself, “Is this worth it?”

Immediately, you’ll think about your budget and see if it’s an expense you can afford. If you can’t, then saying “Thank you” and going out of the store won’t be that hard.

ask questions The Rewards of Questioning Your Every Spending

Getting Your Money’s Worth

One of the advantages of tracking your spending is that it’s easy to see where your money went. When I go through my list, I’d sometimes see an expense where I felt that it was not worth it.

For example, there was a movie expense that after consideration, I felt it was unnecessary to watch it on 3D because I would have enjoyed it even in an ordinary cinema.

And so after that, I became more careful and would ask friends who’d seen a particular movie first if it’s worth the extra money to watch it in 3D.

Meaningful Purchases

Perhaps the best reward when you ask yourself first if something’s worth buying, is that you’ll never spend money on things without a genuinely good reason.

Questioning your every spending does not mean taking out the fun in your life, such as buying that chocolate bar, purchasing that shoe, or watching a movie in 3D.

It’s making sure that your money is always spent on meaningful purchases – on things that give you more than just a fleeting satisfaction.

It’s about spending your hard-earned money not on things, but actually investing it on life experiences that provide self-fulfillment and sincere happiness.

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3 Responses to “The Rewards of Questioning Your Every Spending”


  1. Jethro says:

    I love reading this new post of yours Sir Fitz. I think delayed gratification is related to this. If you badly want to have a new gadget, think first if it is worth to buy later when you have enough money. Chances are after delaying it for months, your interest on it will disappear. In other words, it is not necessary to have that item or gadget as it may belong to wants.

    I also agree with your points here that we should question every spending we do as this will help us not just today but our future as well.To make it short, learn to invest those money to legit investments.

    :)

  2. rico says:

    thanks for this post!!! :)

  3. hime-chan says:

    I can greatly relate to this. Lately, I’ve been delaying some purchases because I keep questioning myself if it’ll be worth it. It’s comforting to know that it’s really not a bad thing to do.

    Just yesterday morning, I was having breakfast with my friends. We were discussing something about traveling then I remembered that I friend of mine invited me to join them in Cebu. It’ll just be an over the weekend escapade. Upon checking my finances, I know that I can really afford it. I just can’t help but voice out my hesitation from joining saying something about having more important things to do with my money.

    Then I got questioned by one of my companions, “What is more important than traveling?!”

    “Uhm, building an emergency fund and investing?” was my awkward reply.

    Fortunately, my wits came back to me and I manage to add up something about having different priorities at the moment. I feel like a kill joy. I’m 24 and that person is already in her 30s.

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