Reader Mail #29: Financial Freedom is Hard To Achieve

Posted by Fitz Villafuerte under Reader Mail on September 30, 2014

It’s been more than 3 months now since I began selling my book, The Ready To Be Rich Guide To Investing, and I’m thankful to all those who wrote me to say that they found it very helpful.

Recently, I got an email from someone who told me his thoughts and realizations after reading it, which I’m now sharing with you with his permission, along with my reply.

I’ve withheld his name upon request, and his message has been edited for his privacy and brevity (this was a very long email actually).

Hi Fitz. Thank you for writing your book because it’s really an eye opener.

After reading it, I felt sad because it made me realize that I’ve wasted so many years by not being financially smart. And now, upon writing my goals in life as you suggested in your book, I see that it’s nowhere within my reach.

I just started saving for my emergency fund, and getting life insurance for my family’s protection is my next step. I’m just glad that I have no debts, and I already have health insurance courtesy of my company.

But after that, when I compute for the required money that I need to invest to achieve my goals, honestly, I feel so hopeless because my salary is too small to be able to meet the deadline that I set for my dreams.

I know the only way is to find another source of income, but I’ve been thinking the past few days and I couldn’t really think of anything that I can do.

Primarily because I work 6 days a week and I’m already very tired after office to do anything else. Also, my rest day, Sunday, is reserved for my family and I don’t want to sacrifice that.

So now, I’m just doing my best to be conscious of my budget so I can save as much money as I can.

Anyway, thank you again for writing the book. It’s now my guide to achieve financial freedom, and hopefully, I can do it too, like you.


Financial freedom is hard to achieve. If it were easy, then everyone would be rich, and more importantly, it won’t be worth pursuing.

Just remember what I said in the book… while it is difficult, it is possible.

And one thing that I failed to mention there is that it eventually gets easier through the years if you stay disciplined and focused on your goals.

On the practical side, here’s what I suggest:

First, ask for a salary increase from your boss. I believe there’s no harm in trying.

Moreover, see if you can negotiate for a change in work schedule – maybe you can give extra hours from Monday to Friday, so you can have your Saturdays free.


Apart from those, you should take advantage of holidays, and leverage your vacation leaves to create another source of income – like starting a simple home-based business.

Also, get your wife and children involved in the process. Ask help from them in thinking of what the family can do to save, and earn more money, particularly for the household.

As a bonus, this is a great way to introduce your kids to the principles of frugality, and entrepreneurship as well.

It’s good that you’ve been thinking of ways to create another source of income. Give it more time and I’m sure an idea will eventually come.

And keep a notebook handy because creativity can strike anywhere. That great business idea could come to you while you’re doing something else, and if you don’t write it down – you might forget about it.

Don’t censor your ideas and just take note of them no matter how silly it sounds in your head. These thoughts can potentially be developed later on to become a better, and profitable venture.

Of course, always be on the look out for income opportunities. Seek them if you must, but be realistic enough to choose the ones that you can actually pursue, given your skills and resources.


Now for some uncommon advise:

Stop working and hoping for that job promotion. Just do what’s required of you at work, and instead focus on creating and developing new sources of income.

You can also look for a new job if you want. One that’s less demanding of your time, even if it pays a little lower – but just as long as the salary can cover your family’s needs.

Remember that a person’s greatest asset in wealth building is his free time.

Moreover, you should spend less time with people who have no financial goals. It may sound harsh, but get rid of the negative people in your life, especially friends who do nothing but complain about how hard and unfair life is.

Lastly, learn how to meditate. This seemingly innocent act of just being quiet, thinking of nothing, for a few minutes every day, is an effective way to silence those lingering thoughts in your head.

Thank you once again for taking the time to share your story and writing to me. I hope I was able to help in giving you more clarity.

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Photo credits: tanakawho and dewittclinton


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10 Responses to “Reader Mail #29: Financial Freedom is Hard To Achieve”

  1. Raymond says:

    Very sound and practical pieces of advice. I am sure I can apply them to myself as well. Thanks for sharing Sir Fitz!

    I also hope your letter sender/ book reader will also meet his goals.

    Good luck! 🙂

  2. Rj says:

    “Remember that a person’s greatest asset in wealth building is his free time.”–WOW very inspring article sir fritz! your blog continues to inspire my journey to financial freedom tlaga po. Godspeed!

  3. Arnel says:

    I have to agree with you Sir Fitz that wealth building really really needs time. It’s sad to say though that most of us do not use our time wisely and just take it for granted.

    It is very hard to think of other options to build wealth when one is already exhausted from work and is excited to entertain or pamper oneself. Nevertheless, if one must strive for achieving his/her goals, then the desire must be there to start the action and the discipline to keep it going.

  4. max says:

    Building wealth takes time and financial goals don’t need to be rushed. It would be ideal be financially free overnight but that’s not always the case. If 10 years seem impossible to reach our goals, we can always give it another 5 years. What’s important is we take all the necessary steps and do whatever it takes to get there. 🙂

  5. Lois says:

    love na talaga kita Sir Fitz. After Suze Orman, ikaw ang pinaka-reliable and trustworthy na financial adviser for me. Sabi nga niya, once a financial adviser starts to sell you something, he/she stops being a financial adviser and starts to be a salesman. then again mahirap daw makahanap ng independent financial adviser dito sa bansa. So for me, you are the closest to one and I always recommend you to my friends because of you’re unbiased and wise judgment when it comes to finances. We can see and feel how sincere you are in wanting to help people, and you’re not blinded by greed as some have become. I’ve heard from a lot of financial experts already, but I haven’t been to any of your talks yet.I’m looking forward to attend one someday. Please continue to inspire people. God bless!

  6. Fernan says:

    nice one fitz! very very nice!

  7. Nolan says:

    Great article Fitz!
    I have been reading your blog for like 3 years already and i’m learning new things everyday!

  8. Kris says:

    “Stop working and hoping for that job promotion. Just do what’s required of you at work, and instead focus on creating and developing new sources of income.” What I am doing right now. at least when the company folds, i have other sources of income

  9. Grace says:

    I want to thank you sir Fitz for sharing your knowledge and wisdom about business to everyone, you are helping a lot of people. I am a housewife here in japan, my husband is in the navy. Although we are financially stable here because he has a stable job, the culture here is not what we really want for our kids, even he who is japanese wants his kids to live in philippines , he prefers our culture and values over his own which is rare for a japanese set of mind. But moving to philippines will be a big gamble for our family financially since I do not have a college degree that can help me find work, all we have is our life savings for 8 years, which is 5 million in philippines. I hope we can invest it wisely so that our family has a future in philippines, having three kids and both having zero business knowledge is scary. But because of your financial advices and no nonsense explanations about investing (thank you so much for that) my fear is starting to fade. My goal is to insure my kids education and our life in philippines, because that is where our heart is.

  10. SnapS says:

    again new lessons learned from you sir Fitz. arigato gusaimasta sensai.

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