Allow Yourself The Uncomfortable Luxury of Changing Your Mind

Posted by Fitz Villafuerte under Mindsetting on November 23, 2015

Have you ever failed an exam because of a single wrong answer? It’s painful to realize that the difference between you and a passing grade was just one question, which you should have gotten right if only you didn’t doubt yourself and changed the answer.

This has happened to me several times – if not one, it’s just two or three questions, which I second-guessed or remembered the correct answer to just minutes after I passed my paper.

But eventually, as it should be, I learned to accept the failing grade, move on, and study harder so I can do better in the next exam.

Such is the life of a student, which in due course, becomes our life after graduation – we face and make choices, commit mistakes, learn to accept failure, move on, and strive to become better next time.

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However, the tests we take in school are not always like what life gives us.

They say that in school, we’re taught the lessons first and then take the test; while in life, we’re tested first and learn the lessons after.

But moreover, in school, we can conveniently get the exam results a few days after to know if we passed or failed; while in life, it can sometimes take years before we know the consequences of our choices; if we succeeded or failed.

Such is life – and the precise reason why you should allow yourself the uncomfortable luxury of changing your mind.

I am a civil engineering graduate, and was able to land a good-paying job after I passed the board exams. A few years into the practice, a door to a career in software development opened up for me.

At that point, I had to make a choice – continue being an engineer or shift to information technology.

I wasn’t failing as an engineer so there was no reason for me to leave the profession. Additionally, there’s no assurance that I would succeed if I went into computer programming. But I nevertheless decided to take the risk and jump ship.

Just a little over a year after, another choice presented itself to me – to stay with my current I.T. path or try my hand at being an entrepreneur.

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Again, there wasn’t any significant reason to change the status quo. In fact, it was more precarious to do so because I have zero experience in running a business at that time. Yet again, I chose to take the risk and jump ship.

I have come a long way from being a civil engineer to being who I am now, a financial advocate. And only time will tell who or what I will become in the years ahead.

I’ve faced hundreds of such opportunities over the years – sometimes I stayed safe and continued with my current path, and sometimes I took the risk and jumped ship.

Some of the choices I made turned out to be good decisions, while some turned out to be bad moves – but as we already know, there are no mistakes in life, only lessons to be learned.

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So what am I really saying here?

First, do not be complacent about your life. When things are comfortable and secure, check if you’re really doing good and getting closer to your goals, or if you just stopped moving forward and trying to avoid further personal growth.

Second, when your life has been reduced to a routine where you’re just waiting for things to happen, then do not be afraid to take a risk and do something new and different.

It will always be uncomfortable, difficult even, but it’s nevertheless a luxury that you can afford to have most of the time; and you don’t need to wait for the results of your previous life choices before you can change and follow a path of new uncertainties.

Author’s Note: The title of this article is a quote from Maria Popova.

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10 Responses to “Allow Yourself The Uncomfortable Luxury of Changing Your Mind”


  1. Rose says:

    This is a beautiful post. Thank you.

    I’m still in my profession since I passed the board exams, but I also did and doing somethings that are very far from my profession. I didn’t jump-ship like you did, but I know in time I will, when my other “profession” or an opportunity so good, I’ll be happy to jump-ship.

  2. AJ says:

    Thank you for the wonderful post.

  3. Jam says:

    Thank you for the push.

  4. Exande Bacolod says:

    Nice

  5. Anieflor S. Ullero says:

    Tnx Fitz, you’re not only a financial advocate you are a teacher in various aspects. I would like to recommend that once again take the risk and jump-ship..go to the church especially so if you are a catholic..the catholic church need knowledgeable people like you. Hope to see you doing some missionary works too. Godbless!

  6. nancybalan says:

    Im a Nurse and a part time Entrepreneur. Its been a couple of year since I accidentally found your blog Sir Fitz. You truly inspired me to become an entrepreneur! and now Im declaring it to the universe that Im on way to Financial Freedom! Met you personally last July 4 ( IMG convention). Looking forward to read your future blogs! God bless you!

  7. thanks for this post fitz, its really telling me to try in avida to be a property consultant-
    i would like to try something new other than in BPO.
    I hope i can also be succesful as you are now. thanks for always reminding us your follower. “,)

    #thewiserbachelor
    vin “,)

  8. Johnhel says:

    A really wonderful post.

  9. John says:

    The title sounds incredibly similar to what Maria Popova of Brain Pickings said in one of her articles back in 2013:

    https://www.brainpickings.org/2013/10/23/7-lessons-from-7-years/

    Fitz, I have no doubt that the story itself is yours, but if the words of the title was borrowed from someone else, you should still give them credit.

  10. Fitz says:

    Hi John, thank you for pointing this out. Proper credit for the quote has been added at the end.

    A friend on Twitter posted those words. She’s a Philosophy major and I’ve gotten used to her tweeting similar thoughts and insights. I liked it and wrote a post inspired by it.

    My mistake was not asking if it was an original thought because I simply told her that I’m going to use it as a title for a blog post, to which she simply said okay.

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